Where are my reverse glass artists?

Still looking for someone who has experience creating reverse glass painting with ink and oils. Also found some old photos, which make for a great TBT (throw back Thursday).

Below: Table at the Broadripple Art Fair which happens every year at the Indianapolis Arts Center. This was during my Native American phase.

026 No Writing (photopaper Jan 94)

 

Close up of one (date is 1993).  I placed them with a shadow box type of backing so that the oil was not up against the matte board. This added shadows and depth.

025 No writing (Photopaper Jan 94)

Reverse Glass Painting and Ink

Copy of IMG_4639

This could have been a “throw back Thursday” post if I had thought of it yesterday. However, it was today when I began searching the internet in an attempt to discover if there are any new types of ink pens that can draw on glass (and have the ink adhere without flaking or rubbing off.)

Amazingly I could find nothing, which I don’t understand. Years ago, before the internet existed, I learned how to create reverse glass paintings and was selling them around the state.

The very first step, when making the fine lines, was to use a Koh-I-Nor Rapidograph Technical Pen, which adhere’s nicely to glass, as well as takes to oil paint being laid over the top of it without smearing or breaking down.

This was a lot of fun, easy to do (as long as you remember to paint everything “backwards” and mirror image”.) So, when I was contemplating laying ink on glass this morning, it seemed like there should be even better technology for this now than there were years ago. The internet came up empty.

The rapidograph pen is pretty thin lined. Maybe I could use a brush to accomplish the same idea for a wider line.

If anyone has any ideas, please let me know. In fact, has anyone out there tried this? I can’t even remember where I learned how to do it, but I love the combination of the “sketch” look with the richness of the oil paints.

I am very interested in this now that it seems it is such a mystery. (And I am wishing I had taken more photos of those old paintings!)

 

Interesting Reference Material found during my search (which wasn’t much):

The History of Silhouettes – E. Nevill Jackson

Catch the Project Big Bucks!

Sheri Garvin:

One of the blogs I illustrate – this blog writer is picking up her pace with big ideas ahead. I think I am going to be busy!

Originally posted on Welcome to Insite Solutions:

Money blowing machine-1

I once was selected to manage a project that had plenty of funding, an abundance of resources, and no urgent deadline. It was like stepping into a Money-Blowing Booth full of $100 bills flying around. Yet after a few months and a considerable amount of time and money spent, there was no real accomplishment and the project was cancelled. I was bewildered and confused! What had happened? I felt like one of those contestants that had just come out empty-handed from one of those booths seen at fairs or tradeshows.

In a Money-Blowing Booth, money is flying everywhere and contestants (project stakeholders) have a limited time to grab as much money (value) as they can. Yet, like many contestants, I had stepped out of the booth empty-handed. So what can a project manager do?

In “How to Catch Money in a Money Blowing Machine”, Eric Ott, an e-How…

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